HAYWOOD, Richard Mansfield

  • HAYWOOD, Richard Mansfield
Date of Birth
Born City
Lynn
Born State/Country
MA
Parents
Charles Edward & Annie Moulton H.
Date of Death
Death City
Charlottesville
Death State/Country
VA
Married
Margaret Rider Mowbray, 6 Sept. 1930.
EDUCATION

A.B. Dartmouth, 1926; Harvard, 1926-7; Ph.D. Johns Hopkins, 1932.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

Instr. Lat., Johns Hopkins, 1932-3; asso. 1933-44; Lat. tech., Hotchkiss School, 1944-50; Instr. Washington Square Coll. NYU, 1950-2; asst. prof, to prof, class. University Coll. NYU, 1952-60; prof., 1960-73; Guggenheim fell., 1939-40; Fulbright res. fell. Stay, 1960-1.

DISSERTATION

“Studies on Scipio Africanus” (John Hopkins, 1932); printed as Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science 51,1 (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1933). REVS: PhW 1933 930-936 Taeger | Gn 1933 394 Gelzer | RA 1933 6ᵉ série I 281 Grimal | JRS 1933 78-80 Scullard | HZ CXLIX 162 Schur ; MC 1936 47-49 Giannelli | RFIC 1936 189-203 de Sanctis | REA 1934 146-147 Piganiol | Historia 1934 125-126 Cardinali | CJ 1934 XXIX 624-626 Brown | RH 1934 LXXIV 118 Albertini ; RPh 1935 225 Bayet | LEC 1934 149 Petitjean | CW 1935 XXVIII 190 Hadas;

PUBLICATIONS

“On Cicero Ad Atticum VI.1.19 and VI.5.,2,” AJP 54 (1933) 66-7; “Some Traces of Serfdom in Cicero's Day,” AJP 54 (1933) 145-53;  “Roman Africa,” with F.M. Heichelheim in An Economic Survey of Ancient Rome, ed. T. Frank (Baltimore: Hopkins Press, 1938); “The African Policy of Septimius Severus,” TAPA 71 (1940) 175-85; “The Oil of Leptis,” CP 36 (1941) 246-56; “Integer vitae and Propertius,” CJ 37 (1941) 28-32; “Was Seneca's Hercules Modeled on an Earlier Latin Play?,”CJ 38 (1942) 98-101; “Comment and Conjecture on Vergil,” with E.B. Stevens, E.L. Highbarger, J.H.H., Savage, C.C. Mierow, C.A. Manning, O.L. Wilner, & R.V. Schoder, CW 36 (1942) 86-95; “Note on Seneca's Hercules furens,” CJ 37 (1942) 421-4; “Comment and Conjecture on Tragedy,” with H.N. Couch, W. C. Korfmacher, H.W. Miller, H.G. Robertson, H.T. Westbrook & J.M.T. Burke CW 36 (1943) 254-61; “On the Unity of the Miles Gloriosus,” AJP 65 (1944) 382-6; “The Strange Death of the Elder Pliny,” CW 46 (1952) 1-3; “The Delphic Oracle,” Archaeology 5 (1952) 110-18; “The Strange Death of the Elder Pliny,” with H.C. Lipscomb, CW 47 (1954) 74; The Myth of Rome's Fall (New York: Crowell, 1958). REVS: CW LII 1959 191 Sullivan | JRS XLIX 1959 211 Momigliano | AHR LXIV 1958-1959 985 Laistner ; AJA LXIV 1960 303 McDermott | AJPh LXXXI 1960 215-217 Salmon | Archaeology XIII 1960 151 Brady | HZ CXCI 1960 683-684 Maier ; Latomus XX 1961 890-891 Courcelle; “Let's Run Down to Baiae,” Archaeology 11 (1958) 200-5; “A Further Note on the African Policy of Septimius Severus,” in Hommages à A. Grenier, ed. M. Renard M. (Berchem-Bruxelles: 61 Av. Laure, 1962) 786-90; Ancient Greece and the Near East (New York: McKay, 1964). REVS: CJ LX 1964 132 Lane | CW LVIII 1964 47 McGregor | AJPh LXXXVII 1966 246-247 Frost; Ancient Rome (New York: McKay, 1967). REVS: CJ LXIII 1968 321-322 Rowland | CW LXII 1968 24 Raubitschek | AJPh XC 1969 376-377 Salmon | JRS LIX 1969 316-317 Scullard | CHR LVI 1971 696-697 Sheerin; “Persius 4.51,” CR 19 (1969) 14-15; “The Poetry of the Choruses of Seneca's Troades, I,” in Hommages à Marcel Renard, ed. J. Bibauw (Brusells: 60 rue Colonel Chaltin, 1969) 415-20; 

NOTES

Richard Mansfield Haywood was a teacher of classics and an ancient historian, devoted especially to the history of Rome, Republic and Empire. His first major work, “Roman Africa” placed him firmly in the first rank of ancient historians. The next 40 years saw the publication of innumerable articles, notes, and reviews, as well as major works. In 1958 he made public his dissatisfaction with Gibbon's premise of decline and fall with the publication of The Myth of Rome's Fall. He wrote to a colleague, “It is essentially an attempt to tell what happened to the Roman Empire between the second and sixth centuries of our era. . . . Although it does not contain prolonged arguments about the theories of others, it does make it plain that I believe that the whole process can readily be understood and explained on the basis of ordinary historical principles; I see no need for mystical explanation.”Richard Haywood was also a dedicated teacher and one devoted to his students, both undergraduate and graduate. Upon his retirement, he and his wife removed to Charlottesville, where he spent his remaining years, having vowed “to re-read the works of Cicero at leisure.”

SOURCES

DAS 1974:201; NYTimes (18 Apr. 1977) 24; WhWh 1976-7:1382.

AUTHOR
Charles W. Dunmore