North American Scholar

MACKENDRICK, Paul Lachlan

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  • Date of Birth (YYYY-MM-DD): 1914-02-11
  • Born City: Taunton
  • Born State/Country: MA
  • Date of Death (YYYY-MM-DD): 1998-02-10
  • Death City: Madison
  • Death State/Country: WI
  • Married: Dorothy Grace Lau, 17 March 1945
  • Education:

    A.B. Harvard, 1934; A.M., 1937; Ph.D., 1938; post-grad. study Balliol Coll., Oxford, 1934-6. 

  • Professional Experience:

    Asst. classics & tutor and. langs., Harvard, 1937-8; instr. Latin, Phillips Acad., 1938-41; U..S. Naval Reserve, 1941-5; instr. English, Harvard, 1946; asst. prof. classics, U. of Wisconsin, 1946-8; asso. prof., 1948-52; prof. classics & integrated liberal studies, 1952-75; Lily Ross Taylor Prof. Classics, 1975-84; prof.-in-charge School of Classical Studies, AAR, summers 1956-9; Guggenheim fell., 1957-8; trustee, AAR,  vis. prof., U. of Colorado, summer 1964; memo. IAS, Princeton, 1964-5; U. Ibadan (Nigeria), 1965-6; Martin Class. Lectr., Oberlin College, 1966; Phi Beta Kappa National Lectr., 1970-1; prof.-in-charge, ICCSR, 1973-4; Rockefeller Scholar-in-Residence, Bellagio Center (Italy), 1977; Overseas Fell., Churchill College, Cambridge, 1977-8; scholar-in-residence, Fondation Hardt, Geneva, 1983; vis. lectr., U. Canterbury (New Zealand), 1985; Macquarie U. (Australia), 19851985; Universidade Fed. de Rio de Janeiro, 1987; Universidade de Coimbra, 1989; external examiner, U. Tasmania, 1990; secy-treas., APA, 1954-6; secy., dir., ACLS, 1956-7; dir., 1960-3; pres. CAMWS, 1972.

  • Dissertation:

    “The Folklore of Athenian Democracy,” TAPA 69 (1938) xliii; “The ἐργαστῖναι and the Attic γένη,” TAPA 70 (1939) xxxix;  “Juvenal and Swift,” with R.I.W. Westgate, CJ 37 (1942) 468-82; “Cicero's Ideal Orator. Truth and Propaganda,” CJ 43 (1948) 339-47; “The Great Gatsby and Trimalchio,” CJ 45 (1950) 307-14; “A Renaissance Odyssey. The Life of Cyriac of Ancona,” C&M 13 (1951) 131-45; Classics in Translation, I, II: Greek Literature: Latin Literature, ed. with H.M. Howe (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1952). REVS: CW XLVI 1952 37-38 Lind | CPh XLVIII 1953 109-112 Bassett | Phoenix VII 1953 122 Hardy | CJ XLVIII 1952-1953 272 Dorjahn | CB XXX 1954 70 Zellner; “Roman Colonization,” Phoenix 6 (1952) 139-46; “T. S. Eliot and the Alexandrians,” CJ 49 (1953-1954) 7-13; “Cicero, Livy and Roman Colonisation,” Athenaeum 32 (1954) 201-49; “Herodotus. The Making of a World Historian,” CW 47 (1954) 145-52; “Demetrius of Phalerum, Cato and the Adelphoe,” RFIC 32 (1954) 18-35; “Asphodel, White Wine, and Enriched Thunderbolts,” G&R 2nd ser., 1 (1954) 1-11; “Roman Colonization and the Frontier Hypothesis,” Social Education (Washington) 20 (1956); “Roman Town Planning,” Archaeology 9 (1956) 126-33; “Kipling and the Nature of the Classical,” CJ 52 (1956) 67-76; The Roman Mind at Work (Princeton: Van Nostrand, 1958). REVS: CB XXXV 1959 60 Rexine | CW LII 1959 156 Haywood |  CPh LV 1960 202-205 Bassett | CJ LV 1960 187 Charles | RBPh XXXVIII 1960 593 de Rijck; “The Pleasures of Pedagogy,” CJ 54 (1959) 194-200; The Mute Stones Speak. The Story of Archaeology in Italy (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1960; London: Methuen, 1962; 2nd ed., New York: Norton, 1983; paperback ed., New York: New American Library, Mentor Book, 1966; New York: Norton, 1976), German trans.: Roms steineres Erbe: Römische Archäologie in Italien (Wiesbaden: Brockhaus, 1967). REVS: CW LIV 1960 26 Benario | CJ LVI 1960 42-45 Ramage | Archaeology XIII 1960 304 Ryberg | AJA LXV 1961 325 Hicks | Phoenix XV 1961 182-183 White | AJPh LXXXII 1961 333 Robathan | CPh LVII 1962 68 Scranton | Latomus XXI 1962 464 | LEC XXXI 1963 118 Walbrecq | CR XIII 1963 337-338 Bräude | StudRom XII 1964 203-205 Romanelli | JRS LIV 1964 230 Frederiksen | G&R XXXII 1985 107 Walcot; “Nabobs as Builders, Sulla, Pompey, Caesar,” CJ 55 (1960) 241-56; The Greek Stones Speak. The Story of Archaeology in Greek Lands (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1962; 2nd ed., (New York: Norton, 1981); paperback ed. (New York: New American Library, Mentor Book, 1966); German trans.: Hellas' steinernes Erbe. Archäologie der griechischen Welt (Wuppertal: Brockhaus, 1965). REVS: LEC XXXI 1963 445 Wankenne | CW LVI 1963 216 Shoe | AHR LXVIII 1962-1963 704-705 Mylonas | Antiquity XXXVII 1963 315-316 Boardman | ABull XLV 1963 372 Scranton | AC XXXIII 1964 273-277 Servais | PACA VII 1964 83 Benjamin | A&R IX 1964 90 Nocentini | CR XIV 1964 92 Cook | Mnemosyne XVIII 1965 89-90 Hemelrijk | CPh LX 1965 39-40 Knudsen | BO XXIV 1967 119 | RBPh XLVIII 1970 1014 Delvoye; “Herodotus, 1954-1963,” CW 56 (1963) 269-75; “Some Books on the Etruscans,” CW 58 (1964-5) 45-6; “Menander on the Mississippi. The Classics in America,” Phrontisterion 4 (1966) 41-6; “Old Guard General, Pompey ‘the Great’,” N&C 9 (1966) 1-11; “Love among the Ruins. A Study of Propertius,” N&C 10 (1967-8) 1-12; “Love among the Ruins. A Study of Propertius,” Nigeria and the Classics 10 (1967-8) 1-12; Western Civilization (New York: American Heritage Publishing Co., 1968). “Herodotus, 1963-1969,” CW 63 (1969) 37-44; The Iberian Stones Speak. Archaeology in Spain and Portugal (New York: Funk & Wagnalls, 1969). REVS: CW LXIII 1970 310 Woods | CPh LXVI 1971 284-286 Henry | Archaeology XXVI 1971 184-185 Richardson; The Athenian Aristocracy 399 to 31 B.C., Martin Class. Lect. 23 (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1969). REVS: CW LXIII 1969 53-54 Urdahl | CJ LXV 1970 278-279 Anderson | G&R XVII 1970 108-109 Sewter | AHR LXXV 1970 1088-1089 Raubitschek | BIEH IV 1970 81 Alsina | AJPh XCII 1971 111-114 Mitchel | CPh LXVI 1971 139 Oost | Hermathena CXI 1971 81-82 Parke | Phoenix XXV 1971 383-386 Derow | REG LXXXIV 1971 174-175 Orieux | Athenaeum L 1972 195-196 Garzetti | Mnemosyne XXV 1972 328-329 Pleket | Gnomon XLIV 1972 93-95 Olshausen | ASNP Ser. 3ª I 1971 505-506 Moggi | CR XXIII 1973 228-231 Davies | A&R XIX 1974 73-79 Pecorella Longo; Romans on the Rhine. Archaeology in Germany (New York: Funk & Wagnalls, 1970); German trans by H. Eggert: Deutschlands römisches Erbe (Wiesbaden: Brockhaus, 1972). REVS: CW LXIV 1971 170 Pollitt | Archaeology XXV 1972 318-319 Matthews | CJ LXIX 1973 169-170 Wassermann; Roman France (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1972). REVS: REL L 1972 395 Grimal | G&R XX 1973 208 Colledge | TLS LXXII 1973 452 | JRS LXIII 1973 284-285 Mann | Antiquity XLVII 1973 162-163 Brogan | AHR LXXIX 1974 1159 Bachrach | CR XXV 1975 109-111 Salway | ACR III 1973 91 Hammond; The Dacian Stones Speak (Chapel Hill: Univ. of North Carolina Press, 1975). REVS: TLS LXXIV 1975 1016 Wilkes | REL LIII 1975 541 Chevallier | LEC XLIII 1975 314 Wankenne | CW LXIX 1976 389 Simon | AHR LXXXI 1976 829-830 Dyson | G&R XXIII 1976 94 Sparkes | ArchN V 1976 57 Wade | Gymnasium LXXXIII 1976 378-379 Nagy | JRS LXVII 1977 236-238 Poulter | CR XXVII 1977 250 Rickman | CJ LXXII 1976-1977 186-188 Pascal | RA 1977 365-366 Turcan | MH XXXIV 1977 205-206 Jucker | Latomus XXXVI 1977 233-235 Cizek | Stud-Class XIX 1980 175-176 Pippidi; The North African Stones Speak (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1980). REVS: AHR LXXXVI 1981 580 Sherk | BIAL XVIII 1981 294-295 Falkner | G&R XXIX 1982 98 Sparkes | ChHist LI 1982 212-213 Dekar | CR XXXII 1982 297-298 Wells | CJ LXXVIII 1982 164-166 Vann | SLS XIII 1982 117-118 Potter | REL LIX 1981 447 Lancel | Latomus XLI 1982 714-715 Chevallier | REA LXXXV 1983 351-352 Lassére; “An Aristocratic Reformer. Kleisthenes and After,” in Studies Presented to Sterling Dow on his Eightieth Birthday, ed. K. Rigsby GRBS Supplement 10 (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1984) 193-202; “The Romans in Burgundy,” in Regional Dynamics. Burgundian Landscapes in Historical Perspectives, ed. Carole L. Crumley & William H. Marquardt (New York; London: Academic Press, 1987) 431-45; The Philosophical Books of Cicero (London: Duckworth, 1989). REVS: TLS 1990 647-648 Wiseman | CR XLI 1991 66-67 Douglas | CW LXXXIV 1990-1991 484 Larson | JRS LXXXI 1991 196-197 Griffin | LEC LIX 1991 86-87 A. Wankenne | Phronesis 1996 41 (1): 116 Bob Sharples | RPh 1995 69 (1): 217-218 Carlos Lévy; The Speeches of Cicero: Context, Law, Rhetoric, with the technical assistamce of Emmett L. Bennett (London: Duckworth, 1995). REVS: AJPh 1996 117 (4): 654-656 John H. Nicholson | CR 1997 N. S. 47 (1): 48-50 Jonathan G. F. Powell | JRS 1996 86: 201-207 D. H. Berry | Phronesis 1996 41 (1): 116 Bob Sharples | RPh 1995 69 (2): 389-390 Philippe Moreau | Gnomon 1998 70 (2): 159 Carl Joachim Classen | LCM 1995 20 (3-4): 57-61 Robin Seager 

     

  • Notes:

    Paul Lachlan MacKendrick was an imposing figure to us, an undergraduate and a beginning graduate student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  Our first impressions in the 1960’s: he grumpily wore a heavy plastic neck-brace most of the day, and a cloud of pipe-smoke surrounded him in his office, classrooms, and hallways. His office was floor-to-ceiling books and journals, with rows of verbatim notebooks, in a perfect hand, from his college days at Harvard and Oxford, and a few copies of erotic Greek vases prominently displayed. Encountered on a late Friday afternoon with a stack of OCT’s under his arm, he said they were for “weekend reading.”  In the Navy during World War II, he had met and soon after married (in Balliol Chapel) Dotty, who was a nurse, and fortunately so. Paul’s attention could not be kept by mundane things like driving and everyday maneuvering about.  He broke his arm, and Dotty drove him to class.  The neck brace was never explained. In London he was hit by a bus (looked the wrong way on crossing), at Heathrow he took a hard hit from a falling Nigeria Airways sign, and in Greece broke his leg during his stint as Visiting Professor at the American School.

    Paul (we could call him that only after we got our Ph.D.s) was the valedictorian at Harvard and wrote his thesis in Latin.  He then spent two years at Oxford University as a student and later as a senior scholar regularly worked at Cambridge University. To us he was more Oxbridge than Harvard, with a strong passion for English (not American) literature, always a bit out-of-place in a huge Midwestern public university. But those years he and Dotty spent virtually every summer in England, Italy, Greece, Germany, Turkey, or North Africa, chasing down new material for his “Stones” books, often on Swans Tours. Why not live and eat well? He was great friends with Nicholas Hammond, Ronald Syme, John Chadwick, and Charles Edson, who all gathered at Edson’s house in Madison at frequent intervals: they all had been spies in World War II, and for that role Paul learned Portuguese.  

    MacKendrick was a most memorable and colorful character, equally intimidating and inspiring in undergraduate Latin and graduate seminars. His standards were of Oxford and Harvard, not of Wisconsin. It was unthinkable to come to his class unprepared.  He marked students’ papers in detail, in red ink, and in a very small but readable hand.  He liked students who found their information in Pauly-Wissowa, but complained of students who knew only Pauly-Wissowa German.  Sloppy work of a class or individual could bring a tongue-lashing.   He was not a mentor but a model, he did not coddle us but challenged us, and for those of us who had the good fortune to study under him he left a life-long impression of what it meant to be a scholar and teacher. 

  • Sources:

    WhAm 52 (1998) 2703; DAS 8,3:330

  • Author: Jon Mikalson & Gareth Schmeling