North American Scholar

FAY, Edwin Whitfield

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  • Date of Birth (YYYY-MM-DD): 1865-01-01
  • Born City: Minden
  • Born State/Country: LA
  • Parents: Edwin Hedge, a teacher, & Sarah Elizabeth Shields F.
  • Date of Death (YYYY-MM-DD): 1920-02-17
  • Death City: Pittsburgh
  • Death State/Country: PA
  • Education:

    M.A. Southwestern Presbyterian U. (Clarksville, TN), 1883; Ph.D. Johns Hopkins, 1890; study at Leipzig, 1891-92.

  • Professional Experience:

    HS tchr. Jackson, MS, & Beaumont, TX, 1883-6; instr. Sanskr. U. Michigan, 1890-1; prof. Lat. U. Texas, 1892-3; prof. Lat. Washington & Lee U., 1893-9; prof. Sanskr. U. Texas, 1899-1920.

  • Dissertation:

    “The Treatment of Rig-Veda Mantras in the Grhya Sutras” (Johns Hopkins, 1890); printed (Roanoke, VA, 1899).

  • Publications:

    “Agglutination and Adaptation,” AJP 15 (1894) 409-22; 16 (1895) 1-27; “Textual Notes and Queries on Plautus,” AJP 18 (1897) 168-88; The History of Education in Louisiana (Washington, 1898); “The Locution infitias it, and the -nt- Suffixes,” AJP 20 (1899) 149-68; T. Macci Plauti Mostellaria (Boston, 1902); “Latin Etymologies,” AJP 24 (1903) 62-74; “Further Notes on the Mostellaria of Plautus,” ibid., 245-77; “Studies in Etymology,” AJP 25 (1904) 163-83; “The Indo-Iranian Nasal Verbs,” AJP 25 (1904) 369-89; 26 (1905) 172-203, 377-408; “The Latin Accusatives Med, Ted, etc.,” CP 4 (1909) 301-12; “Composition, not Suffixation,” AJP 31 (1910) 404-27; “The Latin Confixes -edon-, -edno-, 'eating',” CP 6 (1911) 315-24; “The Latin Dative: Nomenclature and Classification,” CQ 5 (1911) 185-94; “Derivatives of the Root stha in Composition,” AJP 33 (1912) 377-400; 34 (1913) 15-42; “Catullus Carmen 2,” CP 8 (1913) 301-9; “Varroniana,” AJP 35 (1914) 149-62, 245-67; Etymological Notes (Urbana, IL, 1918); “Declension Exponents and Case Endings,” AJP 40 (1919) 416-22; “The Elogium Duilianum,” CP 15 (1920) 176-83.Papers: 10 vols, of papers at U. Texas, Austin.

  • Notes:

    E. W. Fay, one of America's most original and prolific Sanskritists, brought a lifetime of musical study, the practice of writing original verse, and wide reading in a variety of national literatures to his comparative philological work. He was, in addition, well respected as a teacher in the three universities with which he was associated. His shorter publications total nearly 190 items in seven bound volumes and he made 44 contributions to AJP alone. He is best known for his dissertation, but all his works are marked by an unusual originality and he was called by CQ “one of the earliest and most original-minded of its contributors” (14 [1920] 171).

  • Sources:

    “In Memoriam Edwin Whitfield Fay 1865-1920,” ed. Morgan Callaway, U. Texas Bulletin no. 2425 (1 July 1924); C. W. E. Miller, AJP 41 (1920) 96; CJ 16 (1920-1) 376; William James Battle, DAB 6:304; NatCAB 24:328-29; WhAm 1:389.

  • Author: Ward W. Briggs, Jr.