North American Scholar

NUTTING, Herbert Chester

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  • Date of Birth: 1872-01-14
  • Born City: New York
  • Born State/Country: NY
  • Parents: Nathan & Caroline Augusta Jelliff N.
  • Date of Death: 1934-09-23
  • Death City: Berkeley
  • Death State/Country: CA
  • Married: Jessie May LeRoy, 14 July 1897.
  • Education:

    A.B. Yale, 1895; Ph.D., 1897.

  • Dissertation:

    "The Uses of the Independent Subjunctive in Cicero's Orations" (Yale, 1897).

  • Professional Experience:

    Instr. Gk. & Sanskr. U. California, 1897; instr. to prof. Lat., 1898-1934; chair Lat. dept., 1922-34; joint ed. UCPCP; joint ed. CJ, 1916-30; adv. comm. AAR, 1926-7.

  • Publications:

    "Cicero's Use of Subjunctives in si-Clauses," AJP 21 (1900) 260-73; A Supplementary Latin Composition (Boston, 1901; rev. ed. 1908); "The Unreal Conditional Sentence in Plautus," AJP 22 (1901) 297-316; "The Order and Modes of Conditional Thought," AJP 23 (1902) 25-39, 149-62; 24 (1903) 278-303; The Trinummus of Plautus (Boston, 1903); Advanced Latin Composition (Boston, 1904); "Studies in the Si-Clause, I: Concessive si-clauses in Plautus, II: Subjunctive Protasis with Indicative Apodosis in Plautus," UCPCP 1,2 (1905) 35-94; "Unreal Conditional Sentences in Cicero," AJP 28 (1907) 1-10, 153-78; "Cicero Pro Sulla 18,52," AJP 29 (1908) 316-21; Cicero, Tusculan Disputations I, II, V (Boston, 1909); A Latin Primer (New York, 1911); A First Latin Reader with Exercises (New York, 1912; new ed., 1913); Caesar's Use of Past Tenses in cum-clauses, UCPCP 5,1 (1918); "The Ablative as an Apposi-tive," CP 15 (1920) 389-91; "Oculos Effodere," CP 17 (1922) 313-8; "Cicero's Conditional Clauses of Comparison," UCPCP 5,11 (1922) 183-257; Junior Latin Plays (Berkeley, 1922); Teacher's Course in Latin Composition (Boston, 1922); "The Imperfect Indicative as a Praeteritum ex Futuro," AJP 43 (1922) 359-61; Ad Alpes: A Story of Roman Life (Berkeley, 1923; 2d ed., 1927); "Subjunctive Conditions in Tacitus," UCPCP 7,4 (1923) 143-95; "Cicero Tusculan Disputations i.74," CP 19 (1924) 317-28; "The Indefinite First Singular," AJP 45 (1924) 377-9; "The Latin Conditional Sentence," UCPCP 8,1 (1925); "On the Syntax of fretus," UCPCP 8,8 (1927) 305-30; "The Form si sit. . . erit," UCPCP 8,2 (1928) 187-217; The Utor, Fruor Group, UCPCP 10, 1-5 (1928-9); "Notes on the Agricola of Tacitus," AJP 50 (1929) 266-72; "Predicating Periods in Latin," AJP 51 (1930) 57-61; "On the Use of the Term "Ellipsis," ibid., 224-32; "Notes on confido, fido, diffido," UCPCP 10.9 (1931) 219-43; "Comments on Lucan," UCPCP 11, 3-5 (1931-4) 8-12, 105-41, 249-90; "On the Adnominal Genitive in Latin," UCPCP 10.10 (1932) 245-308; "The Hero of the Pharsalia," AJP 53 (1932) 41-52; "On the History of the Cum-Construction," AJP 54 (1933) 29-38; "Notes on Lucan's Pharsalia," CP 29 (1934) 317-27; Pierino Belli, A Treatise on Military Matters and Warfare (De Re Militari et Bello), vol. 2 (trans.) (Oxford & London, 1936).

  • Notes:

    Nutting was perhaps the last major writer on Latin grammar of our time. In addition to his many articles and numerous notes on grammatical usage, he wrote a number of teaching texts, yet was a boring and repetitive teacher, especially in his elementary classes. His student Joseph Fontenrose gives an account: "The Latin text was never read; there was no discussion of a play or poem or essay nor of the author's literary art. The routine was invariable: Nutting called on a student to translate; the student translated a few lines or sentences, and then at a convenient stop Nutting would say, 'Sufficient for the translation,' make any necessary corrections, and occasionally point out some syntactical feature. Then he called on the next person to translate, and the cycle was repeated, and so on through the hour." He also wrote short Latin plays modeled on Plautus, which he would assign his students as an introduction to the author, before reading his edition of the Trinummus. He worked hard in the losing battle to keep Latin in California high schools and, though not warm, was kindly, helpful, calm, and proper.

  • Sources:

    CJ 30 (1934-5) 189; Fontenrose, 24-6, et passim; WhAm 1:908.

  • Author: Arthur E. Gordon