North American Scholar

RAMAGE, Edwin Stephen

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  • Date of Birth (YYYY-MM-DD): 1927-07-19
  • Born City: Vancouver
  • Born State/Country: British Columbia, Canada
  • Parents: Edwin Havelock & Mary Cardinal R.
  • Date of Death (YYYY-MM-DD): 2014-10-25
  • Married: Shirley Sue LaRue, 16 June 1956
  • Education:

    B.A., U. of British Columbia, 1951; M.A., 1952; Ph.D., U. of Cincinnati, 1957.

  • Professional Experience:

    Instr. classics, Indiana U., 1957-60; asst. prof., 1960-4; asso. prof. 1964-8; prof., 1968-93; chair dept., 1971-5; co-dir., Indiana U.-U. Chicago Excavations at Kenchreai, Greece; asst. dean, College of Arts & Sciences, 1962; Bloomington Faculty Council, 1979-81; dir., Indiana U. Summer High School Latin Conference, 1961-71; chair, Educational Testing Service Committee for Revision and Preparation of College Board Latin Achievement Examination, 1978-82. 

  • Dissertation:

    "Urbanitas, Rusticitas, Peregrinitas: The Roman View of Proper Latin" (Cincinnati, 1957).

  • Publications:

    “Note on Catullus' Arrius,” CP 54 (1959) 44-45; “The De urbanitate of Domitius Marsus,” CP 54 (1959) 250-5; “Early Roman Urbanity,” AJP 81 (1960) 65-72; “An Early Trace of Socratic Dialogue,” AJP 82 (1961) 418-24; “Cicero on Extra-Roman Speech,” TAPA 92 (1961) 481-94; “Urbanitas. Cicero and Quintilian, a Contrast in Attitudes,” AJP 84 (1963) 390-414; “Explorations at Cenchreae,” with R.L. Scranton, Archaeology 16 (1963) 286-7; “Investigations at Kenchreai, 1963,” with R.L. Scranton, Hesperia 33 (1964) 134-45;  “Excavations at Kenchreai, 1963,” AJA 68 (1964) 198-9; “Excavations at Kenchreai, 1964,” AJA 69 (1965) 173-4; “City and Country in Menander's Dyskolos,” Philologus 110 (1966) 194-211; “Investigations at Corinthian Kenchreai,” with R.L. Scranton, Hesperia 36 (1967) 124-86; Urbanitas. Ancient Sophistication and Refinement, U. of Cincinnati Class. Stud. 3 (Norman, OK: U. of Oklahoma Press, 1973) REVS: CW LXXIX 1975 216-217 Murison | Augustinus XXI 1976 229 Ortall | CR XXVI 1976 59-60 Winterbottom | JRS LXVI 1976 276-277 Walker | CLS XIII 1976 75 Jaher | Latomus XXXIX 1980 254-256 Stenuit | TLS LXXIII 1974 388; Roman Satirists and Their Satire. The Fine Art of Criticism in Ancient Rome, ed. with D.L. Sigsbee & S.C. Fredericks (Park Ridge, NJ: Noyes Press, 1974). REVS: RPh XLIX 1975 334 Cèbe | EMC XIX 1975 102-103 Sandy | BStudLat V 1975 356-357 Squillante ; CJ LXXI 1976 372-374 Holliday ; G&R XXIII 1976 87 Verity ; REG LXXXIX 1976 653 Hellegouarc'h ; Latomus XXXV 1976 612 Nadeau ; MH XXXIII 1976 60 Paschoud ; Gnomon XLIX 1977 466-470 Korzeniewski ; Athenaeum LV 1977 492-493 Di Salvo ; REA LXXVII 1975 309 Desbordes ; A&R XXII 1977 72-75 degl'Innocenti Pierini ; RBPh LV 1977 1243 Evenepoel ; RSC XXIII 1975 149-151 d'Agostino; Knoche, U., Roman Satire (trans.) (Bloomington: Indiana U. Press, 1975). REVS: TLS LXXV 1976 678 Sullivan | CW LXX 1976 208-209 Green | G&R XXIV 1977 84-85 Verity | AJPh XCVIII 1977 197 Boughner | MH XXXIV 1977 256 Paschoud; Atlantis. Fact or Fiction? (ed.) (Bloomington: Indiana U, Press, 1978); German translation: Atlantis. Mythos, Rätsel, Wirklichkeit? (Frankfurt: Umschau Verlag, 1979). REVS: CW LXXIII 1979 44-45 Schoder | G&R XXVI 1979 210 Walcot | Archaeology XXXII,6 1979 65-69 Rubright | RA 1980 366 Faure | RPh LIV 1980 163 Weil | CJ LXXV 1980 362-364 Kopff | CR XXX 1980 161-162 Hood | LEC XLVII 1979 381 Stenuit; “Juvenal, Satire 12. On Friendship True and False,” ICS 3 (1978) 221-37; “Method and Structure in the Satires of Persius,” ICS  4 (1979) 136-51; “Velleius Paterculus 2.126.2-3 and the Panegyric Tradition,” ClAnt 1 (1982) 266-71; “Denigration of Predecessor under Claudius, Galba and Vespasian,” Historia 32 (1983) 200-14; “Clodia in Cicero's Pro Caelio,” in Classical Texts and Their Traditions. Studies in Honor of C. R. Trahman, ed. with D. F. Bright (Atlanta, GA: Scholars Press, 1984) 201-11; “Strategy and Methods in Cicero's Pro Caelio,” A&R 30 (1985) 1-8; “Augustus' Treatment of Julius Caesar,” Historia 34 (1985) 223-45; The Nature and Purpose of Augustus' Res Gestae, Historia-Einzelschr. 54 (Stuttgart: Steiner, 1987). REVS: CR XXXVIII 1988 436-437 Carter | Gymnasium XCV 1988 457-459 Sonnabend | AJPh CX 1989 177-180 Kienast | JRS LXXIX 1989 204 Levick | REL LXVI 1988 331-332 Callu | Gnomon LXI 1989 635-637 Flach | LEC LVII 1989 87-88 Straus | Athenaeum LXVII 1989 633-635 Noè | Latomus XLIX 1990 875-876 J.-M. André | ZRG CVIII 1991 396-402 W. Waldstein ; AC LX 1991 410 M.-T. Raepsaet-Charlier; “The Date of Augustus' Res Gestae,” Chiron 18 (1988) 71-82; “Cicero's Cato. Form and Purpose,” A&R 34 (1989) 14-25; “Juvenal and the Establishment. Denigration of Predecessor in the ‘Satires’,” ANRW II.33.1 (1989) 640-707; “Sulla's Propaganda,” Klio 73 (1991) 93-121; “The So-Called Laudatio Turiae as Panegyric,” Athenaeum 82 (1994) 341-70; “Augustus' Propaganda in Gaul,” Klio 79,1 (1997) 117-60; “Augustus' Propaganda in Spain,” Klio 80,2 (1998) 434-90; “Augustus' Propaganda in Africa,” Klio 82,1 (2000) 171-207; “The ‘bellum iustum’ in Caesar's ‘De Bello Gallica’” Athenaeum 89,1 (2001) 145-70; “The ‘populus Romanus’, ‘imperium’, and Caesar's Presence in the ‘De bello Gallico’,” Athenaeum 90,1 (2002) 125-46; “Aspects of Propaganda in the ‘De bello Gallico’: Caesar's Virtues and Attributes,” Athenaeum 91,2 (2003) 331-72; “Funeral Eulogy and Propaganda in the Roman Republic,” Athenaeum 94,1 (2006) 39-64.

  • Notes:

    Ted Ramage spent his entire career as a faculty member in Indiana University's Department of Classical Studies and served the Bloomington campus in many capacities through the course of his career. He was a very productive and wide-ranging scholar who remained active in his retirement, publishing nine substantial articles on a range of topics. As a teacher. Ted shared his love of the classics with thousands of undergraduate students, and directed the dissertations of Andrew Adams, Mark Clark, Charles O. Lloyd, Arthur W. Robinson, and Ann Vasaly. Ann Vasaly wrote "Ted Ramage was a thoughtful and conscientious teacher, a fine scholar, and a decent and admirable man. His presence for many years in the Classics Department at Indiana University contributed greatly to its scholarly reputation, as well as to the the excellence of the graduate program. As I look back on a career of some thirty years of teaching, administration, and scholarship, I am struck by the importance to me of Ted's dedication nd generosity as teacher and mentor during the crucial years that launched me on that journey." 

  • Sources:

    WhAm 41 (1980) 2714; DAS 8.3.423.

  • Author: Matthew Christ