North American Scholar

SAGE, Evan Taylor

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  • Date of Birth (YYYY-MM-DD): 1881-05-16
  • Born City: Sutton
  • Born State/Country: NE
  • Parents: Legene Selvy & Lillian Ophelia Evans S.
  • Date of Death (YYYY-MM-DD): 1936-05-30
  • Death City: St Louis
  • Death State/Country: MO
  • Married: Sophie Miriam Shanks, 25 Aug. 1909.
  • Education:

    A.B. U. Nebraska, 1902; A.M. U. Chicago, 1904; Ph.D., 1908; study in Europe, 1906-7.

  • Professional Experience:

    Instr. Lat. & Gk. U. Idaho, 1907-11; U. Washington, 1911-3; asst. prof. Lat. U. Pittsburgh, 1914-9; prof. & head dept. Lat., 1919-33; prof. Lat. & head dept. class., 1933-6; pres. CAAS, 1924-5, 1932-3.

  • Dissertation:

    "The Pseudo-Ciceronian Consolatio" (Chicago, 1910).

  • Publications:

    "The Tribunate of Tiberius Gracchus," CJ 9 (1913-4) 44-52; "Latin in the Freshman and Sophomore Years," CJ 10 (1914-5) 252-61; "Petronius, Poggio, and John of Salisbury," CP 11 (1916) 11-24; "The Date of the Vatinian Law," AJP 39 (1918) 367-82; "The Non-Vergilian Aeneas," CJ 15 (1919-20) 350-7; "Cicero and the Agrarian Proposals of 63 B.C.," CJ 16 (1920-1) 230-6; "Ciceronian Afterthoughts," CJ 17 (1921-2) 256-64; "Notes on Apuleius," CP 22 (1927) 311-2; "Who Should Study Latin?," C7 20 (1924-5) 143-51; "Some Early Latin Textbooks," CJ 20 (1924-5) 280-7; "Giraldus Cambrensis and Petronius," Speculum 2 (1927) 1-4; Petronius. The Satyricon (New York & London, 1929); A Series of Eight Radio Talks Entitled Two Thousand Years of Virgil (Pittsburgh, 1929); "The Text Tradition of Petronius," AJP 50 (1929) 21-39; "The Singrenius Edition of Petronius of 1523," CP 24 (1929) 68-76; "Medieval Conceptions of Vergil and Their Origins," CJ 25 (1929-30) 593-600; A Series of Nine Radio Talks on Ancient Fiction (Pittsburgh, 1930); Livy (trans.), LCL (Cambridge & London, vol. 9, 1935; vol. 10, 1935; vol. 11, 1936; vol. 12, with A. C. Schlesinger, 1938); "The Text Tradition of Petronius," AJP 50 (1939) 21-39.

  • Notes:

    Evan T. Sage, in his capacity as professor both of classics and education, gave long and energetic service to the cause of Latin in the schools. His scholarly interests lay in the manuscript tradition of Petronius and, later, the medieval reputation of Virgil, but his most lasting contribution may be his translation of three volumes of Livy in the Loeb series. His article on the Vatinian Law was controversial. He also wrote a series of articles in CJ, edited the Latin Bulletin, and in 1929 founded the Philological Society of Pittsburgh. In the words of David Robinson, he was "an excellent teacher, a sound scholar, and a cooperative and helpful gentleman.''

  • Sources:

    L. B. Lawler, CO 14 (1936-7) 4; D. M. Robinson, CJ 32 (1936-7) 61; WhAm 1:1073.

  • Author: Ward W. Briggs, Jr.