North American Scholar

SCOTT, Kenneth

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  • Date of Birth (YYYY-MM-DD): 1900-05-04
  • Born City: Waterbury
  • Born State/Country: CT
  • Date of Death (YYYY-MM-DD): 1993-12-11
  • Death State/Country: MD
  • Married: Aurelia Salome Grether, professor of English, 1926.
  • Education:

    A.B. Williams College, 1921; ASCSA, 1921-2; AAR, 1923; A.M. U. of Wisconsin, 1923; Ph.D., 1925; Markham Traveling Fell., Kaiser Friedrich U, Berlin, 1926-7.

  • Professional Experience:

    Instr. Classics, U. of Wisconsin, 1923-4; asst. prof. 1925-7; asst. prof. Latin, Yale, 1927-9; prof., Western Reserve U., 1929-42; master of classics and mod. langs., private school, Concord, NH. 1942-7; master mod. langs., private school, Simsbury, CT, 1947-8;  prof. classics, Upsala Coll (East Orange, NJ), 1948-9; prof. mod. langs., Wagner College (Staten Island, NY), 1949-59; chair dept., 1950-9; asst. prof. Queensbury Community Coll. , U. of New York, 1960-1; asso. prof. 1961-2; prof. for. lambs. & chair of dept, 1962-5; prof. history, Queens College, 1965-70; Guggenheim fell., 1933-4; pres. New York Genealogical and Biographical Society; commander Order of St. Agatha (San marino) 1937; knight, Order of the Crown (Italy) 1938. 

  • Dissertation:

    "The Identification of Augustus with Romulus-Quirinus" (Wisconsin, 1925). 

  • Publications:

    “Identification of Augustus with Romulus,” TAPA 56 (1925) 82-105; “A Study of the Grades of Students at the University of Wisconsin with Reference to Preparation in Foreign Languages,” CJ 22 (1927) 370-9; “On Chapter XVIII of the Res gestae divi Augusti’,” CP 23 (1928) 175-6; “Merkur-Augustus und Horaz C. I, 2,” Hermes 63 (1928) 15-34; “The Deification of Demetrius Poliorcetes, I,” AJP 49 (1928) 137-66; “The Deification of Demetrius Poliorcetes, II,” AJP 49 (1928) 216-40; “Octavian's Propaganda and Antony’s De sua ebrietate,” CP 24 (1929) 133-41; “Plutarch and the Ruler Cult,” TAPA 60 (1929) 117-35; “The Dioscuri and the Imperial Cult,” CP 25 (1930) 379-80; “Drusus, Nicknamed Castor,” CP 25 (1930) 155-61; “Emperor Worship in Ovid,” TAPA 61 (1930) 43-69; “Another of Ovid's Errors,” CJ 36 (1931) 293-6; “On Seneca's Apocolocyntosis, IV,” AJP 52 (1931) 66-8; “On Velleius II 126,” CP 26 (1931) 205-6; “On Apuleius Metamorphoses II 32,” CP 27 (1932) 73; “On Suetonius' Life of Vespasian 12,” CP 27 (1932) 82-4;  “Chapter IX of the Res gestae and the Ruler Cult,”  CP 28 (1932) 284-7; “Tacitus and the Speculum principis,” AJP 53 (1932) 70-2; “The Roman Galleys at Lake Nemi,” AJA 36 (1932) 38; “Two Unpublished Inscriptions from Rhodes,” AJA 36 (1932) 25-6; “The diritas of Tiberius.” AJP 53 (1932) 139-51; “Ein Ausspruch des Tiberius an Galba, Hermes 67 (1932) 471-3; “Tiberius' Refusal of the Title Augustus,” TAPA 62 (1931) xl; “Tiberius' Refusal of the Title Augustus,” CP 27 (1932) 43-50; “Mussolini and the Roman Empire,” CJ 27 (1932) 645-57; “Greek and Roman Honorific Months,” YCS 2 (1931) 199-278; “Humor at the Expense of the Ruler Cult,” CP 27 (1932) 317-28; “The Significance of Statues in Precious Metals in Emperor Worship,” TAPA 62 (1931) 101-23; “The Elder and Younger Pliny on Emperor Worship,” TAPA 63 (1932) 156-65; Selections from Latin Prose and Poetry. An Introduction to Latin Literature with K.P. Harrington (Boston: Ginn, 1933). REVS: CW 1936 XXIX 151 Mitchell; “Statius' Adulation of Domitian,” AJP 54 (1933) 247-59; “The Date of the Composition of the Argonautica of Valerius Flaccus,” TAPA 64 (1933) lxvi; “The Political Propaganda of 44-30 B. C.,” MAAR 11 (1933) 7-49; “Lindos on the Isle of Roses,” A&AW (1933) 235-41; “Two Pasquinades,” CJ 30 (1934) 40-1; “Dio Chrysostom and Juventius Celsus,” CP 29 (1934) 66; “Domitian's Intended Edict on Sacrifice of Oxen,” AJP 55 (1934) 225-6; “La data di composizione delle Argonautica di Valerio Flacco,” RFIC (1934) 474-81; “Domitian's sacrarium of Minerva,” AJA 38 (1934) 183; “The Rôle of Basilides in the Events of A. D. 69,” JRS 24 (1934) 138-40; “Roman Opposition to Scientific Progress,” CJ 29 (1934) 615-16; “Novus Mercurius,” TAPA 48 (1934) xliv; “Mercury on the Bologna Altar,” MDAI(R) (1935) 225-30; Caesaris Augusti Res gestae et fragmenta, with R.S. Rogers & M. Ward (New York: Heath, 1936) REVS: PhW 1936 754 Volkmann | REL 1936 209 Marouzeau | CR 1936 38 Meiggs | BFC 1936 XLII 174 Giannelli | Emerita 1937 204 Clariana | MC 1937 57 Terzaghi; “Archaeological Remains in the castello in Tripoli,” AJA 40 (1936) 121; “Le Sacrarium Minervae de Domitien,” RA 6 (1935) 69-72; “The Athens of Ancient Libya,” Travel 66 (1935) 18-21 & 44; The Imperial Cult under the Flavians (Stuttgart: Kohlhammer, 1936) REVS: SMSR 1936 223-224 Turchi | Religio 1937 377 Buonaiuti | ThLZ 1937 246 Breithaupt | CR 1937 32-33 Syme | REA 1937 69 Chapot | Kl 1937 131 Ensslin | RHR CXVI 1937 228-229 Seston | RSPh 1937 600-602 Allo | CW XXXI 1937 8 Magoffin | Gn 1938 172-174 Taeger | JRS 1938 85-87 Balsdon | AJPh 1938 123 Abaecherli Boyce | HZ CLIX 391 Wittmann | RFIC 1938 416-418 Bersanetti | PhW 1939 158-163 Stein | MC 1940 34-35 Giusti | CJ 1938 XXXIII 544-546 Pappano | “The Dendereh Inscription and Mercury-Augustus,” CJ 32 (1937) 233; “Ruler Cult and Related Problems in the Greek Romances,” CP 33 (1938) 380-9; “Notes on Augustus' Religious Policy,” ARW (1938) 121-30; “Notes on the Destruction of Two Roman Villas,” AJP 60 (1939) 459-62; “The Sidus Iulium and the Apotheosis of Caesar,” CP 36 (1941) 257-72; “Astrologers and the Roman Emperors,” TAPA 78 (1947) 434-5; Counterfeiting in Colonial Connecticut (New York: American Numismatic Society, 1957); Genealogical Data from Colonial New York Newspapers: A Consolidation of Articles from the New York Genealogical and Biographical Record (Baltimore: Genealogical Publ. Co., 1977); New York City Court Records, 1801-1804: Genealogical Data from the Court of General Sessions (Arlington, VA: National Genealogical Soc., 1988); Coroners' Reports, New York City, 1843-1849  (New York: New York Genealogical and Biographical Soc., 1991); Naturalizations in the Marine Court New York City, 1834-1840 (New York: New York Genealogical and Biographical Soc., 1991).

     

  • Notes:

    Kenneth Scott began his career as a prolific classicist with an interest in the beginnings of the Roman Empire. With K.P. Harrington he published a Latin reader, Selections from Latin Prose and Poetry, widely used through the 1960s. Following World War II his interest shifted from the classical world to American genealogy and biography. He moved to Wagner University in New York City and ultimately to Queens College to allow him access to genealogical records of he first half of the 19th century. He published voluminously, ultimately compiling a total of 50 books and over 250 articles in all of his fields of interest (only a sample of the non-classical work is given here.). Apart from genealogy, he wrote a number of articles on counterfeiting in the 19th century, culminating in what is probably his most widely-known book, Counterfeiting in Connecticut an examination of the frequency of the crime's occurrence, the intricacies of detection, and the difficulties in apprehending the perpetrators. 

  • Sources:

    NYTimes (15 December 1993) 

  • Author: Ward W. Briggs, Jr.