All Scholars

SAYLOR, Charles Frederick

  • Image
  • Date of Birth: April 6,1936
  • Born City: San Pedro
  • Born State/Country: CA
  • Parents: to John A., an officer in the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard and Mary Klotnya S.
  • Date of Death: January 20, 2020
  • Death City: Columbia
  • Death State/Country: MO
  • Married: Gayle Galvin, 1958
  • Education:

    B.A., U. Washington, 1958; M.A., 1960; Ph.D., U. California, Berkeley, 1968.

  • Dissertation:

    “Propertius and Main Themes of Roman Amatory Thought” (Ph.D., Berkeley, 1968).

  • Professional Experience:

    Instr. Classics, St. Mary’s College (Moraga, CA), 1965-6; lectr. Class. Stud., U. of California, Davis, 1966-7; asst. prof., San Diego State U., 1967-8; U. Missouri, asst. prof. 1968-71; asso. prof. 1971-7; professor, 1977-2010; chair, Classics Dept., 1984-96.

  • Publications:

    Querelae. Propertius' Distinctive Technical Name for His Elegy,” Agon 1 (1967) 142-9; “Toy Troy. The New Perspective of the Backward Glance,” Vergilius 16 (1970) 26-8; “Propertius' Scheme of Inspiration, WS 5 (1971) 138-60; “Man, Animal, and the Bestial in Lucretius,” CJ 67 (1972) 306-16; “Note on Propertius 1.9.13, compone,” Latomus 31 (1972) 161-3; “Note on Propertius 1.9.13, compone,“ Hermes 100 (1972) 120-2; “The Emperor as insula. Pliny Epist. 6.31,” CP 67 (1972) 47-51; “The Magnificent Fifteen. Vergil's Catalogues of the Latin and Etruscan Forces,” CP 69 (1974) 249-57; “The Theme of Planlessness in Terence's Eunuchus,” TAPA 105 (1975) 297-311; “Symbolic Topography in Propertius 1.11,” CJ 71 (1976) 126-37; “The Meaning of tardus amor in Propertius,” Latomus 36 (1977) 782-93; “Periplectomenus and the organization of the Miles Gloriosus,” Eranos75 (1977) 1-13; “Belli spes inproba. The Theme of Walls in Lucan, Pharsalia VI,” TAPA 108 (1978) 243-57; “Horace, c.1.2 and Vergil's storm (Aen. 1.81 ff.),” Vergilius 25 (1979) 20-5; “Overlooking Lake Vadimon. Pliny on Tourism (Epist. VIII.20),” CP 77 (1982) 139-44; “Curio and Antaeus. The African Episode of Lucan Pharsalia IV,” TAPA 112 (1982) 169-77; “Aeneid 10. The Book of Phantoms,” Augustan Age 2 (1982-3) 48-59; “Animal Imagery in the DRN and the Aeneid,” Florilegium 8 (1986) 1-10; “Some Stock Characteristics of the Roman Lover in Aeneid IV,” Vergiius32 (1986) 73-7; “Wine, Blood, and Water. The Imagery of Lucan Pharsalia IV.148-401,” Eranos 84 (1986) 149-56; “Funeral Games. The Significance of Games in the Cena Trimalchionis,” Latomus 46 (1987) 593-602; “Group vs. Individual in Virgil Aeneid IX,” Latomus 49 (1990) 88-94; “Lux extrema: Lucan, Pharsalia 4.402-581,” TAPA 120 (1990) 291-300; “Amphitryon: The Play on uirtus,” in Studies in Latin Literature and Roman History 9, ed. Carl Deroux (Brussels: Latomus, 1998) 5-22; “Lucan and Models of the Introduction,” Mnemosyne ser. 4, 52 (1999) 545-53; “A Note on Style in Lucan's Episode of Brundisium, Pharsalia 2.610-79,” C&M 51 (2000) 191-5; “Epidicus: More Chance than Management,” BStudLat 31 (2001) 3-11; “Thinking about Friends: Seneca, Epist. 55,” Latomus 61,1 (2002) 102-5; “Turning again in Tibullus 1.5,” in Ancient Journeys: A Festschrift in Honor of Eugene Numa, ed. Cathy Callaway (The Stoa, 2002); “Vana species leti: Cato's March in Lucan, Pharsalia IX,” in Hommages à Carl Deroux. 1,: Poésie, ed. Pol Defosse (Brussels : Latomus, 2002) 458-63; “Open and Shut: The Battle for Massilia in Lucan, Pharsalia III,” Latomus 62, 2 (2003) 381-6; “Inclusion and Exclusion of Characters in the New Comedy Society in Plautus and Terence,” in Studies in Latin Literature and Roman History 14, ed. Carl Deroux (Brussels: Latomus, 2008) 115-30; “The Gifts of Procris,” Mnemosyne, ser. 4, 61 (2008) 651-8.

  • Notes:

    Charles Saylor, known to his friends as “Chuck,” was born in California, and grew up in Seattle, Washington. After gaining the Ph.D. at Berkeley with a dissertation on Propertius written under William S. Anderson, he published articles an unusually wide breadth of period and genre, from Roman Comedy through Virgil and Propertius to the chief subject of his later career, Lucan. He had a parallel interest in the classical tradition among master painters. He was a popular and dedicated teacher from his earliest days in the classroom and when he arrived at the University of Missouri, he had found his home for the next 42 years. An effective chair, a productive scholar and a colleague who could always be counted on for a humorous taken the events of the day.  

  • Sources:

    DAS 10 (2002) 3:241; Family remembrances; personal knowledge,

  • Author: Ward Briggs